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Contact

Info

mji01@risd.edu
maria_ji@brown.edu
(whichever floats your boat)

69 Brown St. #3604
Providence RI 02912
USA

Letters to

This book is the visual marriage of two separate typographic voices. The primary text, Letters to a Young Poet, by Ranier M. Rilke, is a series of ten letters written to a complete stranger (Franz Kappus) who had reached out to him for guidance in poem writing. By the end, however, the reader feels much more acquainted with Rilke, to the point of even friendship. His writing style is abstract and pensive — so much so that the letters read as journal entries, as a stream of thoughts on paper, rather than responses to a specific person. Despite the age of the text, many of the lessons and themes that Rilke emphasizes transcend the century of difference. The secondary text is derived from a piece that I wrote in a Comparative Literature class. My own writing highlights specific personal memoirs dealing with both art and life decisions, as a contemporary parallel to Kappus. In joining the two texts, I hoped to create a dialogue between the two voices — and in doing so, explore the relationship between specificity and ambiguity, as well as between diversity and unity.

Printed and bound at RISD for Typography II, taught by Lucinda Hitchcock
Spring 2015

Letters to

This book is the visual marriage of two separate typographic voices. The primary text, Letters to a Young Poet, by Ranier M. Rilke, is a series of ten letters written to a complete stranger (Franz Kappus) who had reached out to him for guidance in poem writing. By the end, however, the reader feels much more acquainted with Rilke, to the point of even friendship. His writing style is abstract and pensive — so much so that the letters read as journal entries, as a stream of thoughts on paper, rather than responses to a specific person. Despite the age of the text, many of the lessons and themes that Rilke emphasizes transcend the century of difference. The secondary text is derived from a piece that I wrote in a Comparative Literature class. My own writing highlights specific personal memoirs dealing with both art and life decisions, as a contemporary parallel to Kappus. In joining the two texts, I hoped to create a dialogue between the two voices — and in doing so, explore the relationship between specificity and ambiguity, as well as between diversity and unity.

Printed and bound at RISD for Typography II, taught by Lucinda Hitchcock
Spring 2015